Monthly Archive: May 2015

1

Fix the Hryvnia? Never Again!

The National Bank of Ukraine is set to adopt a combination of inflation targeting and a floating exchange rate regime. The transition to the new regime is likely to be complicated because of undeveloped markets, unstable fiscal situation, a war in Eastern Ukraine and a myriad of other factors. However, the gains from this new regime temporary volatility.

1

Sasha Borovik: Long Journey Back Home

Ukraine must embrace a bold, liberal, economic agenda. Speaking the truth about economic reforms shows respect for our nation. Speaking boldly and honestly about hardships and how to achieve a better future also increases the odds of political and economic success, provided those reforms are designed to provide opportunities for the current population and the next generation.

0

Effects of Fiscal Shocks in a Globalised World

The effect of fiscal policy on aggregate economic activity is of key interest to policymakers and academics alike. However, identifying fiscal shocks in the data is challenging. This column uses daily data to evaluate the effect of government defence spending on forward-looking variables. The results indicate that government spending shocks lead to an appreciation of the domestic currency. This findings does not hold if low-frequency data are used instead.

0

Ukrainian Question in the British Political Elite

On May 7, 2015 there was a general parliamentary election in the UK. Before the election VoxUkraine has asked the UK Parliament candidates three questions about their views on the Budapest memorandum and territorial integrity of Ukraine, economic and military support to Ukraine, and whether the actions of Russia pose a national security threat to the UK. Here is the detailed analysis of the answers.

3

“De-Communization Laws” Need to Be Amended to Conform to European Standards

On April 9, 2015 the Ukrainian parliament by a comfortable majority adopted four laws that have become collectively referred to as de-communization laws. Objections to the law have varied from hopelessly simplified rhetorical battles along the lines of “the laws are falsifying and re-writing “true” history/the laws are liberating “true” history from the clutches of the Soviet propaganda,” to the identification of specific troubling consequences of these laws. To truly comply with the European practices, the laws dealing with totalitarian regimes and fighters for independence ought to be amended in a way that actions defined by inherently ambiguous terms (“denial of the criminal nature of the regime,” “denial of the legitimacy of the struggle for independence,” “information aimed at justifying” regimes, etc) are not made punishable offenses, whether administrative or criminal.

2

Why Ukraine Should Take Notice of UK Parliamentary Elections

On May 7, 2015 the Britons will vote in a general election which will determine the composition of the new parliament and affect the UK’s foreign policy. VoxUkraine has asked the UK Parliament candidates three questions about their views on the Budapest memorandum and territorial integrity of Ukraine, economic and military support to Ukraine, and whether the actions of Russia pose a national security threat to the UK. So, what can Ukraine count on?

2

Why One Should Support the Kyiv Post

Editorial Note: The Kyiv Post has informed us that they had removed the advertisement of their website – we applaud the Kyiv Post for its quick and correct reaction, and we’d like to repeat: we are big fans and avid readers of the Kyiv Post. We encourage our English-speaking readership to subscribe to this oldest and best Ukrainian newspaper in English. We are sure that the ad was one-time error and should not cast any shadow on editors or writers of the Kyiv Post .The ad is a one time incident and does not represent a systemic issue. VoxUkraine has been unable to find other examples of this type of ads on the KyivPost site.