Monthly Archive: July 2016

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Settlers and “housing problem”, or why 1.5 million migrants haven’t affected the housing market in Ukraine

Donetsk, Luhansk, Kharkiv and Zaporizhia region, according to official statistics, received over 70% of all settlers from the occupied part of Donbass, that is more than 1 million people. It seems that such a significant and almost immediate increase in population would have resulted in a boom in the housing market. But this did not happen. What rules is the housing market for IDPs works?
Full text is available in Ukrainian and Russian.

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How Gas and Coal Can Ensure the Well-Being of Future Generations of Ukrainians

Having equalized the internal and import prices of gas and coal, the Ukrainian government has created the conditions for a significant increase of investment in the extraction of these minerals and thus for a potential increase in government revenues in the future. Andriy vigirinskyi explains why part of the revenue from the sale of minerals has to be accumulated in the Fund of the National Well-Being for the sake of the future generations. Full text is available in Ukrainian and Russian.

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Competition Law and Policy in the United States (and Ukraine). Part 2. Mergers and Acquisitions

When two independent firms “merge” to become one combined firm, the economist assumes that they do so in the expectation that their joint profits will increase as a result. Since profits are a component of economic welfare, as that term is used by economists, the presumption may be that mergers are usually good for the economy. Still mergers are a subject of antitrust and regulation.

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In Memory of Pavel Sheremet

One year ago, John Herbst said that the ongoing war in Ukraine was a battle between the past and the future, which meant that the latter would certainly win. Unfortunately, the outcome is not so clear anymore. It seems that instead this is a battle between the world of free people and a totalitarian dystopia. Pavel Sheremet knew perfectly well how to do that, and he worked to this end until his last breath. With his words, he restrained the onslaught of the darkness, just as the Ukrainian military holds it in check in the East of Ukraine. In memory of him, and of all those who have died and continue dying in this war, and above all, for the sake of those alive, we have no right to retreat.

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Who Is to Blame for the Halving of the Banking Network in Ukraine

In the last 2.5 years, the amount of bank branches has fallen by 8,468 and now stands at 10,822. The Russian occupation and the cleanup of the banking sector are accountable for the closure of 5,500 branches. However, other branches were closed by stable banks. VoxUkraine has found out whether it is the growing poverty in Ukraine or new technologies that has “killed” more branches. Full text is available in Ukrainian and Russian.

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Fact-Checking the Education Sector in Ukraine. Admission Campaign in 2016: Mistakes of the Ministry of Education

There are multiple topics in education that create a fertile ground for manipulating facts, e. g. university admissions campaign, an increase in the number of students that are enrolled in state-funded programs, the position of Ukraine in the education rankings etc. The CEDOS analytical center has joined the VoxCheck initiative and has checked the most dubious statements made by the officials in the education sector. CEDOS has found seven mistakes in the statements by the minister Liliya Hrynevych, first deputy minister Inna Sovsun, and in the press releases of the ministers of education and economy. Full text is available in Ukrainian and Russian.

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iMoRe 39: Judicial Reform Continued

Judicial reforms keep the iMoRe index in a positive territory. Nevertheless, the value of the index remains low, this time due to the unconsidered government decision to increase the number of publicly financed spots for students at universities and the lack of significant developments in public finances and energy.

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Operation “Verification”: Where the Ministry of Finance Discovered 5 Billion Hryvnias in Fraudulent Welfare Benefits and Why the Government Will Continue Paying Them

As a part of social welfare verification, the Ministry of Finance was able to gain access to and audit only 70 percent of the total amount of social payments and 22 million of welfare recipients. The scale of potential misuse is overwhelming — over 500,000 violations totaling to more than five billion hryvnias: pensions for “ghost recipients”, payments to “lost passports”, subsidies for people who are far from being poor, as well as financial aid for fake IDPs who still prefer to reside in the occupied territories of Donbass. And the list is far from complete. Why are chances slim that hundreds of thousands of violations will be curtailed?