Monthly Archive: January 2016

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Index for Monitoring Reforms (іMoRe). Release 27

Index for Monitoring Reforms (iMoRe) from VoxUkraine aims to provide a comprehensive assessment of reform efforts by Ukraine’s authorities. The Index is based on expert assessments of changes in the regulatory environment in five areas. The iMoRe value for the 27th monitoring period (January 11-24, 2016) stood at +1.4 points out of the possible range from -5.0 to +5.0 points. The greatest achievements were registered in anti-corruption sphere in this round, though experts note that the effectiveness of the adopted regulations will depend on the willingness of the authorities to implement them.

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Evaluating Ukraine: the PISA Ranking

At the beginning of 2015, the Ukrainian president approved the Strategy 2020 program, a strategy which includes 25 key performance indicators (KPI) which can be used to assess Ukraine’s progress in implementing the strategy program. In a series of upcoming posts we will evaluate how likely it is that Ukraine will reach some of these KPIs by 2020. The first KPI we evaluated was ‘winning 35 medals at the 2020 Summer Olympic Games in Japan’. Here we evaluate the goal of ‘being in the top 50 of the PISA ranking’.

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Import Substitution is Not an Optimal Policy Solution for Ukraine

The beneficiaries of an import substitution policy are domestic industries that are not able to compete with cheaper or better quality imports. Consumers will be those who pay for import substitution, because the price for a product eventually goes up as a result of the import substitution policy. A shift to a service-based economy can be a possible alternative.

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2016 Budget Package: What It Means for Ukraine’s Economy

The 2016 “budget package” approved by Ukraine’s Parliament in the end of December represents a step in the right direction, for it notably lowers the taxation of salaries and redistributes significant resources from the public sector to the private sector. However, it should be viewed as just a first step forward with broad reform agenda remaining in the budget-related sectors and beyond.

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Evolution of Ukrainian Economic Complexity: Jogging in Place

Using Economic Complexity Index, which is based on trade data, we explore revealed technological sophistication of Ukrainian economy. We find that the structure of Ukrainian export has remained largely the same as 20 years ago with large share of metals, minerals and agricultural products that turn out to be among least technologically advanced industries. As a result, Ukrainian economy lags behind those economies who were able to specialize in more sophisticated industries. Policy-makers must identify and remove obstacles that dampen innovation and reorientation towards more knowledge-intense industries.

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Land Prices and Size of the Market: What to Expect for Ukraine

Development of sales market of agricultural land in Ukraine will be driven by two main factors: by a set of restrictions and distortions that will be stipulated by Law on land turnover (e.g. maximum size of land holding, access to land market by legal entities and foreigners, establishment of pre-emptive rights), and by access to capital. It is expected that prices for agricultural land in Ukraine will be significantly lower than in most Western European countries but similar to prices in Eastern Europe.

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Index for Monitoring Reforms (іMoRe). Release 26

Index for Monitoring Reforms (iMoRe) from VoxUkraine aims to provide a comprehensive assessment of reform efforts by Ukraine’s authorities. The Index is based on expert assessments of changes in the regulatory environment in five areas. The iMoRe value for the 26th monitoring period (December 21, 2015 – January 10, 2015) stood at +1.6 points out of the possible range from -5.0 to +5.0 points. The adoption of the budget and other laws from the budget package, civil service reform, optimization of administrative services, some deregulation measures and on-going reform of “Naftogaz Ukraine” all were the major contributors to the Index growth.

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Mentality, Ukraine’s Past and Mr. Vakarchuk

It is difficult to build social trust with such a legacy of deformities. But as with any other pathology, the first step requires publicly identifying the problem, grasping its historical roots, and then explicitly rejecting the past and honestly committing to a future. Thankfully, Ukraine is no longer isolated. Now comes the hard part: challenging moral degradation, challenging and rejecting virtuality, and rebuilding almost from scratch the Ukrainian legal system.

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Ukraine and the International Criminal Court: a Constitutional Matter

The idea of international criminal justice in the context of the recent events in Ukraine has been highly popular in the domestic political discourse. The dramatic events, which started in November 2013, have brought the issue of Ukraine’s cooperation with the International Criminal Court to the centre of public attention. At the same time, the ICC and its powers are widely misunderstood and misrepresented.