Monthly Archive: December 2015

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The 2015 Ukraine Viewing List

In 2015, lots of great articles were written about Ukraine. On top of that, many great videos were made, illustrating Ukraine’s beauty, its potential, its achievements but also its troubles. Here you can find a ‘viewing’ list, a list of links to some of the best videos made on Ukraine in 2015. Some videos explain Ukraine’s current situation.

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The VoxUkraine Reading List – Best of 2015

Ukraine continued to draw international headlines in 2015. Like at the end of 2014, to help those looking for quality information on Ukraine, we have created a reading list of what we consider some of the best articles on the Ukrainian economy written this year. Our reading list is ordered by topics. We start with the most important topics of this year: the conflict in the East of Ukraine, corruption, reforms and the discussion on Ukraine defaulting on its debt. Then follow some miscellaneous topics

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What will Inflation be in 10 Years? Theory and Forecast

Robert Solow, a Nobel prize winner, suggests that the country can has inflation because it expects inflation, and expects inflation because it has it. Once economy happens to be in such high inflation equilibrium, it is hard to get out from it. Given that Ukraine has had high and volatile inflation since its independence, it may seem that the situation is hopeless and forecasting inflation at long horizons is futile. Yuriy Gorodnichenko is sure that this is a wrong view.

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Index for Reform Monitoring (іMoRe). Release 25

Index for Monitoring Reforms (iMoRe) from VoxUkraine aims to provide a comprehensive assessment of reform efforts by Ukraine’s authorities. The Index is based on expert assessments of changes in the regulatory environment in five areas. The iMoRe value for the 25th monitoring period (December 7 – 20, 2015) stood at +1.4 points out of the possible range from -5.0 to +5.0 points, marking the highest level since end-August 2015. Contributing to the Index increase were (i) cancellation of a number of outdated national technical standards, (ii) the sharp increase in salary cap for managers of state enterprises, (iii) decentralization of government functions such as registration of real estate and enterprises, and (iv) some anti-corruption initiatives from “EU visa-free package”.

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Beyond the Words: Actual Collaboration in the Ukrainian Parliament

Dmytro Ostapchuk and Tymofii Brik are sure that the co-dependence between coalition and opposition is evident in the numbers. However, these trends do not match with the public announcements of the party leadership. For example, there were no public announcements of the unity between the coalition and opposition in the same way as Poroshenko, Yatsenyuk, and Groisman announced their bonding. And yet, it seems that such announcement would have more empirical ground.

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Why Cutting Military Spending Still Might Make Sense

Tom Coupe is sure that a decision whether or not it makes sense to invest in military expenditures should weigh off different ways to increase Ukraine’s territorial integrity and its expected GDP, not just focus on military expenditures. And the debate should be based on marginal returns, not average returns.

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The Ukrainian Tax System: Why And How It Should be Reformed? Part IV

‘Equal conditions for all’ is not a bad idea. However, as Vladimir Dubrovskiy explained in previous articles, it should be first realized with respect to the general system. As long as the latter is repressive, discretional, unfair and full of really large leakages, there is no point in harmonizing the STS with it – simply because as of now it is much healthier in itself. Instead, Vladimir Dubrovskiy admits it could be better to make an opposite harmonization – try to make the general system equally simple in use, straightforward, predictable, corruption-proof, and equal for all.

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IMF, Ukraine and Russia: A Love Triangle

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) made two important decisions recently. First, the IMF issued a new policy that allows the IMF, in certain circumstances, to provide financing to a country even when it has outstanding arrears to official bilateral creditors. Second, the IMF ruled that Ukrainian bonds purchased by the Russian government to help the Yanukovych government is bilateral intergovernmental debt. In this article Yuriy Gorodnichenko is analyzing what do these decisions mean for Ukraine.

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Ukraine Reform Monitor: December 2015

The Ukraine Reform Monitor provides an independent, rigorous assessment of the extent and quality of reforms in Ukraine. The Carnegie Endowment has assembled an independent team of Ukraine-based scholars to analyze reforms in four key areas. This third memo covers October and November 2015. The main political event in Ukraine during the October–November period was the October 25 local elections. These much-anticipated elections did not fundamentally change the balance of political power in the country. However, they renewed concerns about the enduring power of oligarchs in some regions and demonstrated the residual strength of former president Viktor Yanukovych’s Party of Regions in others.